grantcuster
grantcuster:

A day late for his would-be 51st birthday it’s probably time I finally blog about my treatment of David Foster Wallace’s Host. The detailed explanation is available on site but wrapped up in the project is a long-held affection for Wallace, a curiosity about the still underexplored possibilities for long-form text on the internet and a desire to just try some stuff.
There are four different footnote options to explore and I’d love to hear peoples’ thoughts on their favorites, their most hated, or an option they would have liked to see instead.
Someday there’ll be a longer post on skeumorphism, footnotes vs. hyperlinks, physical vs. digital possibilities, and maybe content geography, but, for now, this.

grantcuster:

A day late for his would-be 51st birthday it’s probably time I finally blog about my treatment of David Foster Wallace’s Host. The detailed explanation is available on site but wrapped up in the project is a long-held affection for Wallace, a curiosity about the still underexplored possibilities for long-form text on the internet and a desire to just try some stuff.

There are four different footnote options to explore and I’d love to hear peoples’ thoughts on their favorites, their most hated, or an option they would have liked to see instead.

Someday there’ll be a longer post on skeumorphism, footnotes vs. hyperlinks, physical vs. digital possibilities, and maybe content geography, but, for now, this.

Books Read in December, January

December

The Story of Edgar Sawtelle

  • The same person who recommended I read Risk Pool (blah) recommended Edgar Sawtelle around the same time (years ago). This was one of the best books I’ve read in years. 

Girls in White Dresses

  • Read while at airport, fine airport reading. Wouldn’t recommend.

U and I

  • A better read about being a writer than On Writing. Fell in love with Baker.

On Writing

  • I love King, I’m a huge fan of The Dark Tower series but I didn’t get much out of this. I think so many blog posts, etc have recycled/summarized his tips that I didn’t need to read the book.

January

How to Be A Woman

  • Not as great as people said it would be, some moments of sudden clarity, she struck a few profound thoughts in my head but her writing style (I hate when authors use all caps) bothered me.

The Sluts

  • Told through reviews/entries on a message board, read the entire thing in one sitting, great, gave me nightmares for a week.

Tiny, Beautiful Things

  • I’m an idiot and for some reason assumed the advice would be different than what I’ve already seen on The Rumpus. 

Girl, Gone

  • Oh, the ending is so creepy and made me so angry.

Seating Arrangements

  • Was frightened it would be another Girls in White Dresses, it wasn’t - it was great. The plot was obvious and characters stereotypical except for small, wonderful quirks that kept the story fascinating and horridly realistic.

Beautiful Ruins

Currently

Rabbit, Run

  • Picked it up during U and I, can’t get past his perfect metaphors, to the point that it becomes a distraction from the narrative. Kinda don’t love it? 

Tenth of December

  • Saunders is great, all his character voices sound the same, bothers me. 
Updates.
My contribution to Thanksgiving dinner. Eat while warm, burn your tongue, worth it.
Since I’m no longer cataloguing books I’ve read for Judging, I figure I should go back to blogging them, kinda.
November reads
Plan B
Read on plane to Arizona, regretted the time spent reading it. Does Jonathan Tropper have an obsession with his past? The only book I’ve also read of his was The Book of Joe but it again focused on hometown friends, fame, and attempts to reconnect with the past.
The Age of Miracles
Read on plane back from Arizona, slightly less regretted time spent reading it than Plan B. Couldn’t get rumors of her advance out of my head, felt like publishers threw money at it hoping it’d be a phenomenon like Room, instead was more like The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake; fascinating in theory, underdeveloped plot.
Of Human Bondage
This book has been on my shelf for over three years. I’m happy I finally read it. I’m in love with Mildred. I can’t get Hayward out of my mind, particularly when dealing with similar, real-life characters. I would’ve supported Philip smothering his uncle but he was the unluckiest man in the world so it probably wouldn’t have turned out well. Reminded me of Twenty Thousand Streets Under the Sky. 
The Year of Magical Thinking
A present from co-workers Jake and Nick, their answer to my claim of ‘no good memoirs’. It was good. I cried. I won’t approach Blue Nights.
Balthazar
I (re)read the Alexandria Quartet whenever I hate love. 
Currently reading
The Risk Pool
Richard Russo is a good author that I can say nothing interesting about - his book was on my shelf, I’m reading it, I’m enjoying, I won’t regret the time spent reading it, but I’ll put it down after finishing and never think of the book again.
The Turn of the Screw
The Master (not the movie, Toibin’s book) made me fall in love with Henry James. Currently reading this on my commute, love free ebooks on Kindle. Am only 20 of those little epages into the story, so nothing to say yet.

Updates.

My contribution to Thanksgiving dinner. Eat while warm, burn your tongue, worth it.

Since I’m no longer cataloguing books I’ve read for Judging, I figure I should go back to blogging them, kinda.

November reads

Plan B

  • Read on plane to Arizona, regretted the time spent reading it. Does Jonathan Tropper have an obsession with his past? The only book I’ve also read of his was The Book of Joe but it again focused on hometown friends, fame, and attempts to reconnect with the past.

The Age of Miracles

  • Read on plane back from Arizona, slightly less regretted time spent reading it than Plan B. Couldn’t get rumors of her advance out of my head, felt like publishers threw money at it hoping it’d be a phenomenon like Room, instead was more like The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake; fascinating in theory, underdeveloped plot.

Of Human Bondage

  • This book has been on my shelf for over three years. I’m happy I finally read it. I’m in love with Mildred. I can’t get Hayward out of my mind, particularly when dealing with similar, real-life characters. I would’ve supported Philip smothering his uncle but he was the unluckiest man in the world so it probably wouldn’t have turned out well. Reminded me of Twenty Thousand Streets Under the Sky

The Year of Magical Thinking

  • A present from co-workers Jake and Nick, their answer to my claim of ‘no good memoirs’. It was good. I cried. I won’t approach Blue Nights.

Balthazar

  • I (re)read the Alexandria Quartet whenever I hate love. 

Currently reading

The Risk Pool

  • Richard Russo is a good author that I can say nothing interesting about - his book was on my shelf, I’m reading it, I’m enjoying, I won’t regret the time spent reading it, but I’ll put it down after finishing and never think of the book again.

The Turn of the Screw

  • The Master (not the movie, Toibin’s book) made me fall in love with Henry James. Currently reading this on my commute, love free ebooks on Kindle. Am only 20 of those little epages into the story, so nothing to say yet.